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Vic Freeze: Power in Music

24: Introduce yourself to everyone that doesn’t already know who you are.

Vic Freeze: Yep. What’s good fam? 4 more years..Obama!! We witnessing history in the making. Anyway..Thx for having me for the interview session. For those of you that don’t know.. my name is Vic Freeze. Currently up da way, reppin Cleveland. Salute to all of Ohio as well.

24: Before we get into your music, can you describe your history and how you got into music and what inspired you?

Vic Freeze: First and foremost..my parents had me young. I think 16 and 17..and they still made it.
That’s serious. You know a lot of kids don’t get that. I remember it and respect it. As far as inspiration musically, my momma and my daughter standout. My first memories are of music and sports u know. Choir rehearsals, p-funk vinyls, jazz, rock, and pop…They will be the first to admit that Hip-Hop found me at an earlier age..I remember one of my mom coworkers was a DJ and he gave me my first mixtape when I was 8. It had KRS-One, Rakim, Luke, Ice T, NWA, Geto Boyz, Kool G Rap, Big Daddy Kane and Kool Moe Dee. Run DMC,Beastie Boyz, and early Public Enemy.
Music is powerful…I mean if you listen to Sam Cooke it’s gonna make you feel somethin’ Recently, When my daughter was born the songs and concepts just changed for me. My agenda is much different now..not concerned about time any more. Everything is much more calculated n precise. And more pocket driven..oh yeah and a point. As far as how I got started rapping..I always wrote poems, songs, thoughts and rhymes. That was natural. I think the emceeing part was just the progression of me as a person being able to express myself. Like being on a basketball team and everybody know you nice but they just want you to show what they believe and have a break out game. Where you just erupt for a 20 spot in a quarter. That’s how me and rap was for a long time..I was good…but now I know I’m good and can prove it consistently. If you can freestyle for hours at a time but can’t put together a song or got a 100 songs and got a whack ass show..Or got dope music and nobody hear it..what’s the point fam? I learned to be myself and be great at what I’m good at and get better at the shit I m not. That’s when I found my niche. I’m just gone be me and keep banging out. I gotta thank my ace Paulie Rhyme for that one. I wish I could tell you I just hopped On stage and …well okay I did just hop on stage lol.. but I wasn’t a battle champion or showcase winner Hip-Hop has kept me sane over the years..spotlight or not it’s part of who I am. At first, I made beats, then I was on shows, helped throw shows, and was in 3 different groups. There was a hiatus..Eventually I understood this is the way it need to be. Besides my daughter…recording and performing is where my passion lies.

24: What was the Hip-Hop scene like for you growing up where you’re from?

Vic Freeze: I gotta say this. I only met him a handful of times but he a legend around Cleveland man..
Suave Goddi…made me want to become an emcee. There is a difference between an artist and an emcee. The thing that I like about true emceeing is though somebody might not be your ace, you never know what a bar can do. It can kill a career or it can jumpstart one. So that time frame was amazing to me because I went to the Bone Thugs & Harmony shows, MC Brains, Brothers4theStruggle. There was a whole bunch of cats, I bought they music and went to they shows before I learned how to make music myself. I was a fan. I didn’t have to watch MTV or listen to reggie radio all the time. I felt linked in with flyers, mixtapes, live shows, and clubs ..that was it for me. And it made me want to figure out how can I get my ideas to come out the speaker like dem cats.
There was so much talent around Cleveland back then…and now as well. If you go to Cali..or New York or Atlanta..you meet Cleveland transplant..We definitely out here.

24: What makes you Unique as an artist and different from other Rappers out now?

Vic Freeze: Lol..I have done shows in Montana, Idaho, and West Virginia places like that.. not many can say that. Beyond being dope which every artist thinks they are. Underground, conscious, old school, or intelligent…whatever you try to label it at the end of the day it’s on somebody playlist and it’s a win/win for me. You gotta be willing to invest in yourself to put your music out to as many people as possible. I had to learn what I wasn’t too perfect what I am. And it’s helped get my music from Cali to Germany. And I know what I’m not now. I think a lot of artists try to be too much. I’ve heard people say best actor win out. But I’m only best at being me talk or not..it’s a market for that. Keep it real with yourself first. The biggest positive I got going for me is people feel something about my content. My lyrics cut across genres, races and generations.

24: Tell us about what you are working on.

Vic Freeze: Eventually, I’m going to do another solo album in 2013. I’m just reaching out working w/ other artists/ producers I think are dope on singles and EP’s. Connecting with DJ’s and media outlets. Letting people get to know me. Performing and to step up the viral presence. I’m not kidding myself I know this is a business but there’s no reason I shouldn’t be out here even as a unsigned artist. I gotta get and keep the buzz up. Dot I’s and cross T’s u know.

24: What producers have you worked with and who would you like to work with in the future?

Vic Freeze: Right now, I ve worked with De-App Did That for Ohio Soundlab.. that’s family. As well as my homie Rey Res I met him on tour a couple years ago. He from San Jose. Dude is nasty. Madd Caesar is a production duo that had me out a couple times to Oakland. We vibed out and when I wasn’t induced into a THC coma we recorded Oakland, Ohio. Others that left an impression..Chris Avery, IQ, Malcolm Lee. As well as the dudes that produced “4 Da Guap”, Clockwork Muzik in Cleveland. I m not gonna act like they haven’t been a good look. A breath of fresh air is more like it..sometime as artists we just need a little inspiration and the canvas start getting wet up, lol. For the record I’ll do it but I don’t like the sendspace, dropbox shit. It’s necessary but when possible I just hop in the whip or be in the wind to track out. Let’s knock out a session or two during a weekend and everybody wake up Monday and keep it movin, lol. Those are things you never forget. Hmm..in the future. If I had a choice ..honestly there are still some people in Cleveland I haven’t caught up with yet. It’s a dude named Phenom that all my homies have at least one track from. DJ Besto is dope. Oh I d like to work with the Kickdrums too .That’s what’s real right now. Thanks for the reminder, I need to make those things happen ASAP. On some “I shook up the world” who wouldn’t work with Kanye, Just Blaze, Big K.R.I.T? Or getta a classic Primo beat. That’s wet dream territory. One day I guess..but the process won’t change for me. You know whether it’s right or wrong before you get in the booth.

24: Are you happy with the feedback you have been getting from people on material you have released?

Vic Freeze: A year ago, when I released Reluctant Star I would have said no.
Two years ago I was just doing my first solo vid…I was just trying to get material out.
I don’t think nobody was paying any f’in attention. But Oakland,Ohio kinda threw everybody off. I had a single “Hard Times” that charted on Internet Radio and I actually had to start checking my inbox, lol. It was more of a concept project..electro, downtempo, and it got me some burn. But I think I did my due diligence, studied, and worked doubles and triples to make this shit take off. Life has a way of evening things out. People been listening/ commenting/ watchin’..u know its love and hate. But it’s way better than being ignored..Who makes music for people not to feel anything. If it ain’t making you feel some kinda of way then u need to get back in the lab. Point blank.

24: In today’s free download age, what do you need to do to make yourself a household name?

Vic Freeze: Understand that “a household name” is a brand. Bumped my head a couple of times, but I got that point. I’m headed in the right direction. Definitely want to keep creating a movement beyond music where people spend they money because they believe and want to be a part of it. My job is to stay consistent. Keep the product A1 and make sure I m easy to find when people check for me or they will check for somebody else.

24: How do you feel about the current state of the Hip-Hop scene?

Vic Freeze: You can hear the music changing. IN CLEVELAND..it’s amazing..a little watered down like everywhere else but there are a lot of artists that get it. And people are coming out…and not to support just they groups. I went to the Ohio Hip-Hop Awards this year and that was a like a new life for me. (Promoters, artists, producers, managers, brand designers, and media people) There’s a support system that wasn’t there when I started or damn.. maybe I wasn’t paying attention.
Overall, I think it trend both ways. For the naysayers, I say you got control over some stuff.
What? nobody turn off the radio no more..or reload the iPod or change the channel. Or delete the f’in spam…Or even get the hook off the stage no more? It must not be whack if you buying show tickets.
Maybe you just like whack shit, lol. Seriously though..there are some ultra talented emcees and some groundbreaking, mind altering messages and music taking place as well. Like anything else out here some of its in your face..some of it you gotta google and search for or you might just go down the street in your town and watch some history. I just been walking into shows in Cleveland lately to soak up the ambiance. That’s just how I am. I enjoy hip-hop and like watching what it mean to them. People still lazy..but people still grind. You do still have a choice who and what to support. Honestly, it don’t really bother me though cuz without all the garbage, we wouldn’t feel the way you do about all the dope shit. (Pause) Do I wish dudes would stay creative? Sure I do..but we
do live in a copy & paste society and we wouldn’t be doing this interview if you thought everybody was next.

24: Outside of the music, what else are you currently working on?

Vic Freeze: Right now ..Working on helping getting my daughter situated. Sometime life throw
you a curveball..I have responsibilities and I gotta make sure she good. There are things bigger than music. Other than that I wanna hit the road w/ the homie DJ Jack da Rippa “Dust Attics Tour” to really say it’s official. This weekend warrior crap needs to be over. If I’m out here..I want to be out here.

24: Where do you see yourself going in 2013 and how do you plan to separate yourself from the other artists out today to get the recognition you feel you deserve?

Vic Freeze: Continue to grow and keep our pockets correct. I’ve learned respect earned is usually respect given. #Buzz. Being everywhere and nowhere, rocking 2 or 20000. Being a link in the chain when I have to and layin the foundation to continue to build a future for my brand, music partners, family, friends , fans. I want people to stop and listen when I’m on something I truly feel like that’s possible even with all the competition. With that said.. take advantage of opportunities like
this one and make the best of them..u know..Things will shake. They already shaking.

24: How can fans go about contacting you?

Vic Freeze:
Website: www.VicFreeze1.com
Facebook Fan page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Vic-Freeze/171898326254587?ref=hl
Twitter: @VicFreeze
For booking info, drop: vicfreeze1@gmail.com

24: Thank you for providing 24HourHipHop.com with this exclusive interview, do you have any last words for your present and future?

Vic Freeze: Yeah G, I owe a lot of people that looked out when they didn’t have to..they know who they are. And like it or not we are participating in another “Renaissance of Hip-Hop”.

“Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn. They teach you there’s a boundary line to music. But, man, there’s no boundary line to art.” –Charlie Parker

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